5 Reasons You’re Not Improving as a Runner

Share it:
5 Reasons You’re Not Improving as a Runner

There’s no magic bullet when it comes to running, or running faster, however, there are many things you can do to improve your running — and they all add up. Luckily, it’s less complicated than you think.

While there are myriad ways to tweak your running for improvement, most of them fit into five categories: supplementary strength work, running volume, consistency, variation and nonrunning activities. While there is overlap among each of these categories, it’s best to address all five in some capacity to get the most out of your training.

Here are five common mishaps that can keep you from realizing your running potential:

1. YOU’RE NOT SUPPLEMENTING YOUR RUNNING

Runners are a frequently injured bunch. Some studies show injury rates for runners as high as 60–65% annually. Running consistently is more than half the battle, but to be consistent, you need to prevent injuries by supplementing running with strength and core work.

Running is a demanding and repetitive sport, and it can be hard on your body if you don’t take the time to strengthen the muscles that support you. As you progress and start to get faster, there’s a tendency for your aerobic fitness to outpace your structural fitness. That means you’ll get faster before your body is ready to handle the extra speed, which can result in injury.

Since many of us are largely sedentary outside of our workouts, our bodies aren’t always prepared to handle the stress of running. Fortunately, even a small amount of regular strength training improves our structural fitness and allows our bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles to support us and stay healthy while running.

Simple Solution: Perform 10–15 minutes of core work or strength exercises after each run.


READ MORE > CROSS-TRAINING WORKOUTS EVERY RUNNER SHOULD TRY


2. YOU’RE NOT RUNNING ENOUGH

It’s not higher mileage that’s inherently risky — it’s the periods when you’re increasing mileage that pose risks.

While all runners need time off and have seasons where they’ll train more heavily than others, the key is not to let your base mileage dip too low. While there is no exact number that’s right for every individual, here’s an example to illustrate this principle: If your high mileage weeks peak in the 40s, then it’s beneficial to keep your lowest base mileage weeks in the 20s.

Runners who tend to get injured the most are the ones who stop and start often, or take frequent weeks or even months off. They are constantly in a cycle of trying to rebuild, which puts them at a greater risk for injury. If there is any magic bullet to running, it’s that running more mileage, more consistently, will help you improve.

Simple Solution: Stay consistent with how many days you run each week, even when you’re not training for something specific. It’s all too easy to get off track when you start skipping runs on a regular basis.


READ MORE > THE 3 TYPES OF RUNS EVERY RUNNERS SHOULD DO


3. YOUR TRAINING IS INCONSISTENT

Inconsistency will thwart even the best intentions and can be your worst enemy when it comes to improving your running. Consistency, on the other hand, is your best friend. Running is cumulative over months and years of training, and consistency is what allows you to weave together a sustainable running career.

Inconsistency can crop up in several areas — from mileage and number of runs per week to speed workouts. Sometimes it’s due to an unavoidable overload in other areas of your life, but a lot of the time it’s simply a result of losing focus or motivation, or not following a quality training plan.

Stay consistent by focusing on the little things that motivate you to get out on a regular basis, whether it’s a goal race, fundraising and training for a cause, catching up with a friend or just enjoying the energy that comes from starting your day with a run.

Simple Solution: Find a plan that works for you, and stick with it! A coach will provide the most personalized schedules, but there are plenty of great resources and training plans available to keep you on track.


READ MORE > WHY YOU NEED TO DO BOTH GROUP AND SOLO RUNS


4. YOU NEED MORE VARIATION

First consistency, now variation? Yes, you need them both. Although this may sound contradictory, the key is knowing when to apply each principle. Here are some areas of running where you want variation:

  • Types of runs: Easy, moderate and hard running all have their place. If you want to keep improving, you don’t want to run the same pace and distance every day.
  • Workouts: These will vary depending on what type of race you’re training for. Over the course of a week, your workouts should include variety ranging from moderate tempo runs to difficult race-pace intervals.
  • Running surface: Many of us spend a lot of time on the road, but the constant pounding can be tough on your body. Vary the surface you run on each week, and include trails and softer surfaces. Your feet and legs will thank you.
  • Shoes: It’s ideal to rotate among 2–3 types of shoes each week. This is yet another way to minimize the repetitive nature of running. You may want to try a lighter, more minimal shoe for speed sessions and a more supportive shoe for longer or recovery runs.

Simple Solution: Make each run have a purpose. When your run is supposed to be easy, don’t be tempted to push hard. And when you have a key workout, give it your all. Avoid constantly staying in that “too-hard-to-be-easy-but-too-easy-to-be-hard” zone that provides minimal benefit.


READ MORE > WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR FEET WHEN BUYING RUNNING SHOES


5. THE REST OF YOUR LIFE IS HOLDING YOU BACK

The life of an elite runner is set up to provide the greatest possibility for improvement and success. They often run twice daily, get 8-plus hours of sleep along with a midday nap, have regular massages and bodywork — and spend hours on core and strength sessions in addition to their running. But that schedule is impossible for 99.9% of us.

Even if we can’t replicate their schedules, we can certainly incorporate some of their habits into our own training. Here are several things that may be affecting your ability to improve:

  • Get enough sleep: This is your body’s prime time for repair and recovery. If you’re training hard, you aren’t going to recover well if you don’t get enough rest.
  • Pay attention to your nutrition: Simply focus on eating more real, whole foods. If you put your energy toward adding more fruits and vegetables into your diet and minimizing sugar and processed foods, you’ll have a fantastic “whole-food” diet. This becomes increasingly important as your mileage builds.
  • Limit life stress: Build a schedule that works with your life. Try to plan your training and races in a way that works with your current schedule and reduces stress. When major life events happen, let running be an outlet rather than an added stress.
  • Keep up with body maintenance: Maybe you can’t get a massage every week like the elites do, but you can certainly book one on occasion and keep up with self-maintenance, like foam rolling, at home.

Simple Solution: Don’t try to change too many things at once. Make simple, sustainable changes, like getting to bed 15 minutes earlier each week or adding more vegetables to one meal each day.


READ MORE > EVERYTHING RUNNERS NEED TO KNOW BEFORE GETTING A MASSAGE


Don’t let any of these reasons keep you from running your best. If you’re looking to improve, addressing these options is a great place to start.


GEAR UP FOR YOUR NEXT RUN

> Running Shoes
> Trail Running Shoes
> Stability Running Shoes
> Lightweight Running Shoes


Related